Which Pyrex bowls are valuable?

Patterned Pyrex—such as the 1956 Pink Daisy or the 1983 Colonial Mist—also tend to be valuable as a collector’s item. Some patterned collections, like the 1959 Lucky in Love heart and four-leaf clover design, have been valued as high as $4,000 for one bowl.

>> Click to read more <<

Beside this, are Corningware and Pyrex made by the same company?

CorningWare was first introduced in 1958 by Corning Glass Works—the same company that manufactured our beloved Pyrex—featuring unique glass-ceramic (Pyroceram) cookware resistant to thermal shock.

Considering this, are old Pyrex bowls worth anything? Some vintage Pyrex can earn up to $3,000, reports NPR—nevermind that it’s not dishwasher safe, and it’s a pain to lug around compared to modern iterations. Sure enough, we found a 1950s set selling for $1,850 on Etsy, and one from 1960 for $700 on eBay. There’s even a rare vintage Pyrex bowl mold going for $1,000.

Besides, how can you tell good Pyrex?

They can be identified by the logo which is in all upper case letters and the glass will be clear, not blue. TLDR: Look at the Logo, PYREX (All uppercase) is good, pyrex (all lowercase) potentially explodes in the microwave.

How can you tell if Pyrex is vintage?

Use the glass markings, stamps, and logos on the pieces themselves to identify when the glass was produced. The oldest Pyrex markings should be on the bottom of glass pieces and feature Pyrex in all capital letters inside a circle with CG for Corning Glassworks.

Is Pyrex the same as Corelle?

What Is Corelle? Introduced in 1970 by Corning—the same company that makes Pyrex—Corelle dinnerware became “all the rage” throughout the following decades.

What do the numbers on the bottom of Pyrex mean?

Pyrex dishes also hide a little secret code: Many contain a three- or four-digit number that corresponds to a specific dish. A series of Mixing Bowls will feature 401 (1.5 pint), 402 (1.5 quart), 403 (2.5 quart), 404 (4 quart). The iconic two-quart green-and-white casserole dish is a 232.

What is a Cinderella bowl?

Cinderella Story. In 1957, Corning’s Pyrex kitchenware designers devised a few new shape models to freshen things up a bit. These were, primarily, a set of four nesting mixing bowls, with new round casseroles in a handful of sizes following in 1958.

What is the oldest Pyrex pattern?

Atomic Eyes is the oldest Pyrex pattern known to exist.

Originally released as the “Hot ‘N’ Cold Chip and Dip Set,” this set was simply a large and small mixing bowl with a metal bracket that allowed the dip to be suspended over the bowl of chips.

What is the rarest Pyrex pattern?

Pretty much everyone in the Pyrex collecting community agrees that Lucky in Love is the rarest Pyrex pattern ever released. Lucky in Love is an elusive print that dates to 1959 and only appeared on one-quart round casserole dishes.

Which is better CorningWare vs Pyrex?

Essentially, the main difference between Corningware and Pyrex is that Corningware tends to be smaller, and more aesthetically pleasing. No one wants to see grandma’s gorgeously glazed holiday ham in a Pyrex dish; presentation is everything!

Why is vintage Pyrex so valuable?

Prices in the Pyrex market are set by the two factors that guide most markets: demand and rarity. Throughout the decades, Pyrex produced a slew of promotional items and limited-edition patterns in small quantities, and those are seriously coveted by collectors.

Why was CorningWare discontinued?

In 1998 however, due to slumping sales and retooling of manufacturing plants, Corning sold off the CorningWare and Pyrex lines to World Kitchen, LLC. Under new direction, the CorningWare and Pyrex lines are still pretty strong, although different.

Leave a Comment